Dr Philip Wood
 


Dr Philip Wood

Dr Philip Wood completed his DPhil at St John’s College, Oxford in 2007, followed by a British Academy post-doctoral Fellowship at Corpus Christi. His research considers the intersection of political and religious ideas in the late antique Middle East. His doctorate was published as an OUP monograph in 2010, and it will soon be followed by a second monograph based on his post-doc, The Chronicle of Seert. The Christian Historical Imagination in Late Antique Iraq, which focusses on the writing of history by Christians in Sasanian and Abbasid Iraq. 

Dr Wood has taught the political and cultural history of late antiquity at Oxford and Cambridge universities for the last six years. He has also taught the same period at SOAS focussing on Martyrdom and Monasticism in the Near East within the department of the Study of Religions. Dr Wood was previously Osborn Fellow in early medieval history at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge and a  Director of Studies in history.

Contact Details
Email address: philip.wood@aku.edu ​
Telephone: 020 7380 3832


Publications​

Monographs

  • The Chronicle of Seert. The Christian Historical Imagination in Late Antique Iraq (Oxford: OUP, 2013).
  • We Have no King but Christ. Christian Political Thought in Greater Syria on the eve of the Arab Conquest, 400-c.585 (Oxford: OUP, 2010).

Edited volume

  • History and Identity in the Late Antique East (500-1000) (New York: OUP, at press).

Journal articles and Book chapters

  • ‘The Chronicle of Seert and Roman ecclesiastical history in the Sasanian world’ in History and Identity in the Late Antique East (500-1000) (New York: OUP, 2013).
  • ‘Introduction’, History and Identity in the Late Antique East (500-1000) (New York: OUP, 2013).
  • ‘Collaborators and dissidents: Christians in Sasanian Iraq in the early fifth century’, in T. Bernheimer and A. Silverstein (eds.) (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2012).
  • ‘The chorepiscopoi and controversies over orthopraxy in sixth century Mesopotamia’, Journal of Ecclesiastical History (2012).
  • ‘Syriac and the “Syrians”’ in S. Johnson (ed.), The Oxford Companion to Late Antiquity, (New York: OUP, 2012).
  • ‘Christian authority in Abbasid Syria: The Life of Timothy of Kakushta’, Proche-Orient Chrétien (2012).
  • ‘Multiple voices in chronicle sources: The reign of Leo I in Book Fourteen of Malalas’, Journal of Late Antiquity 4 (2011).
  • ‘The chroniclers of Zuqnin and their times (c.720-75)’, Parole de l’Orient (2011).
  • ‘Being Roman’ in Procopius’ Vandal Wars’, Byzantion (2011), 424-447.
  • ‘Excluded from power? The boundaries of orthodoxy in the works of Athanasius and John of Ephesus’, in P. Booth, M. Del Santo and P. Sarris, The Age of the Saints? Conflict and Dissent in the Cult of the Saints (Leiden: Brill, 2011), 62-76.
  • ‘The invention of history in the later Roman world. The conversion of Isauria in the Life of Conon’, Anatolian Studies 59 (2009), 129-39.
  • ‘Syrian Identity in the Cave of Treasures’, The Harp (2007), 41-50.